Triple triumph in the finale: Audi crowns its most successful DTM season

Twelve victories, twelve pole positions, twelve fastest laps, 40 of 54 possible podium finishes: The Audi RS 5 DTM with its new two-liter four-cylinder turbo engine was the measure of all things in the 2019 DTM. In the manufacturers’ championship, Audi scored 1,132 points – more than twice as many as its immediate rival BMW. After René Rast had clinched the drivers’ title as early as in the third from last race at the Nürburgring, Nico Müller, with a victory in the last race, secured the runner-up’s finish in the championship ahead of Marco Wittmann in a BMW. In the teams’ championship, the three Audi Sport teams, Rosberg, Abt Sportsline and Phoenix, took the top three spots.

“Everyone at Audi can be proud of this exceptional season,” said Member of Audi’s Management Board for Development Hans-Joachim Rothenpieler, who accepted the trophy for the manufacturers’ championship at Hockenheim. “This was Vorsprung durch Technik par excellence, but also a fantastic achievement by the entire Audi squad.”

Audi’s CEO Bram Schot and Hildegard Wortmann, Member of the Management Board for Marketing and Sales, attended the DTM finale as well, and at the garage of Audi Sport Team Abt Sportsline, were delighted to see Nico Müller score his third victory this season and positions two and three by Mike Rockenfeller and René Rast.

On a rain-wet track, Nico Müller from Audi Sport Team Abt Sportsline was unbeatable on Sunday: from pole position, the Swiss drove to victory in commanding style in spite of having lost some time at the pit stop and briefly dropping behind René Rast. “There’s hardly anything better than finishing the season with a victory,” said Müller. “The runner-up’s spot in the championship is now locked in, too. It was an outstanding season. Thank you to Audi and ABT for the great job this year.”

Thanks to Mike Rockenfeller’s second place, Audi Sport Team Phoenix still bumped BMW Team RMG from the third spot in the teams’ championship in the last race. “It was extremely slippery today,” said “Rocky.” “Unfortunately, my second set of tires didn’t work well. But fighting back from sixth on the grid to second place is absolutely okay.”

Following his victory the day before, René Rast achieved another podium finish. On lap one, the two-time DTM Champion catapulted himself from eighth on the grid to second position, and briefly led the race afterwards before having to let Nico Müller and Mike Rockenfeller pass him. “Standing on the podium and holding the champion’s trophy in my hands was a very emotional moment,” said Rast. “I was dreaming of racing in the DTM for a long time. That I’ve now won the title for a second time is awesome. I’m happy for everyone who helped make my dream a reality – it’s an incredible feeling. Thank you to Team Rosberg, thank you to Audi!”

Masterful DTM Champion: René Rast celebrates seventh victory this season

Under the eye of Audi’s Management Board Member for Development Hans-Joachim Rothenpieler, Rast achieved another perfect day on Saturday. On a rain-wet track in the morning, he secured pole position for the eighth time this year. In the race, Rast immediately took the lead on a dry track. Following his pit stop, he only had to briefly let BMW driver Marco Wittmann pass him before successfully countering and bringing home victory in commanding style. After crossing the finish line, Rast exuberantly celebrated the 17th win in total in his career with donuts and also flung his racing shoes toward the audience after the race.

“That was an outstanding race,” said Rast. “In qualifying, our timing was perfect. Even though I had two cars in front of me on the last lap I was able to clinch pole position. In the race, Marco came very close to me at times. We had a nice battle for some laps but in the end I was clearly faster and won the race – a fantastic feeling!”

Among the first to congratulate him after the race were team founder Keke Rosberg and his son, Nico. The two Formula One World Champions were delighted about the early win of the DTM teams’ championship, marking the second teams’ title for Audi Sport Team Rosberg after 2017.

Mike Rockenfeller from Audi Sport Team Phoenix in third position completed another double-podium for Audi. “It was a nice race but I was struggling a little with my tires and wasn’t able to quite keep pace with René and Marco,” said “Rocky.”

With Robin Frijns from Audi Sport Team Abt Sportsline in fourth position and Rockenfeller’s teammate Loïc Duval in fifth, a total of four Audi drivers finished Saturday’s race in the top five.

Premiere at DTM finale: Audi RS 5 DTM with innovative fuel for the first time

“Audi has set itself the ambitious goal of successively achieving a reduction of about 30 percent of vehicle-specific CO2 emissions by 2025,” says Ulrich Baretzky, Head of Engine Development at Audi Motorsport. “Obviously, electric mobility plays a major role in this context. However, we still have a large fleet of passenger cars using classic internal combustion engines in existence worldwide that will be with us for many more years. By using low carbon fuels, a really noticeable CO2 reduction could be achieved for these cars without having to make technical changes. It’s great that motorsport is once again playing a pioneering role. We are excited about the idea of reducing CO2 emissions through the use of waste.”

The more climate friendly high performance fuel developed by Aral, which Audi will be using as part of the pilot test at the DTM finale, has a composition of 50 percent being made up of high-quality renewable components derived from waste materials. Even so, in terms of its properties, it meets the quality standards of the “Aral Ultimate 102” fuel that has been prescribed in the DTM since 2005. It has a CO2 reduction potential of more than 30 percent compared to gasoline purely based on mineral oil.

“We did not have to make any modifications to the DTM engine and have not had the slightest problem on the test bench so far,” says Ulrich Baretzky. “Consequently, we are proving that low carbon fuels are also suitable for racing engines.” Audi has also been researching alternative fuels for road car production for several years. The company is working independently on projects for the production of e-gas, e-diesel and e-gasoline.

Audi, the city of Ingolstadt and Telekom cooperate on 5G technology

The memorandum of understanding is the basis for the development of a digital transport infrastructure that in the long term will offer people greater road safety, better traffic flows and real-time digital services. The city council of Ingolstadt had already approved the cooperation and an application to set up a 5G model region in July.

5G as a technological prerequisite for connected mobility

The future 5G cellular network standard will allow significantly higher bandwidths and virtually real-time network responses. 5G is thus an essential technological basis for communication between different road users, automated driving and connections to the Internet of Things (IoT).

One possible 5G application is connected traffic signals at road junctions that exchange anonymized movement data with cars and other road users via the 5G network. This will enable drivers or cars themselves to react more quickly to unforeseen movements. Mobile 5G devices of pedestrians and cyclists can also be integrated into real-time communication between infrastructure and cars, so that all road users can be connected as comprehensively as possible. Furthermore, new technologies such as 5G can reduce the time spent searching for parking spaces, which is a significant proportion of increased traffic volumes in cities. Free parking spaces will be communicated to drivers as real-time information so that they can navigate directly to them.

Ingolstadt as an innovation cluster

The city of Ingolstadt will comprehensively support the installation and development of the cellular infrastructure of Deutsche Telekom, thus supporting application-oriented developments in the mobility sector, for example. As well as Audi, other industrial companies will be able to use the local 5G infrastructure.

In order to actively inform and involve the local population, a public event is planned at which the three partners will provide information on the technology, measures to be taken and specific fields of application of the 5G initiative.

“As a technology location, Ingolstadt is open to and welcoming to innovations. Together with companies and scientists, we are prepared to cooperate here in the testing and development of applications. Because if new technologies promise an advantage, we should also use them for the benefit of people. We see cooperation on the ‘Ingolstadt Test Field’ as a contribution towards securing qualified jobs in our city and as a demonstration of our efforts as a location for digital mobility. As with all innovations, however, the population must also be involved in 5G and actively informed about the technology and related projects,” says Dr. Christian Lösel, Mayor of Ingolstadt.

“As a technology leader, Deutsche Telekom is supporting the city of Ingolstadt and Audi with the implementation of their innovative ideas. We are bringing 5G not only to the people of Germany, but also to the country’s industry. In the future, innovation and 5G will be inseparable. We are therefore delighted to be working with Audi and the city of Ingolstadt,” says Martin Knauer, Head of Cellular Sales for Business Customers at Telekom Deutschland.

“Consistently connected – that’s our goal along the way to the mobility of tomorrow. On the basis of 5G technology, Audi as an automobile manufacturer can contribute towards improving mobility in cities. Together, we are developing integrated solutions for the city of the future,” says Peter Steiner, Managing Director of Audi Electronics Venture GmbH.

Audi Electronics Venture GmbH (AEV) has been developing new technologies for the automobiles of the Audi brand since October 2001. The 100‑percent subsidiary of AUDI AG works on new functions and new software, scouts the globe for innovative technologies, invests in startups and cooperates with companies from other industries. In order to meet the challenges of the dynamic high‑tech environment, AEV focuses on combining its own strengths with those of its partners. In this way, AEV accelerates its development cycles and thus effectively extends Audi’s Vorsprung durch Technik

Update for the powerful wagon: The new Audi RS 4 Avant

“Combining consistent sportiness with unlimited everyday usability may seem like an unconventional idea to some, but to us, the high-performance Avant is one of the best concepts of our 25-year history,” says Oliver Hoffmann, Managing Director of Audi Sport GmbH. “As our long-standing bestseller, the Audi RS 4 Avant contributes significantly to the success of Audi Sport GmbH.”

Muscular: the exterior design

The front section of the new RS 4 Avant was completely redesigned. The RS 4 Avant differs considerably from the A4 Avant. The Singleframe is wider and flatter as compared to the base model. Just like its big RS brothers, the RS 6 Avant (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 11.7–11.5 (20.1 –20.5 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 268–283 (431.3–455.4 g/mi)) and the RS 7 Sportback (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 11.6–11.4 (20.3–20.6 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 265–261 (426.5–420.0 g/mi)), the RS 4 Avant also features the three-dimensional honeycomb structure in gloss black that is typical for the RS model series. To give it a clean look, the Singleframe is designed without a frame. The new eggcrate grille with the RS 4 emblem is inserted directly into the bumper with the large lateral air inlets and vertical flaps.

The shape of the LED headlights of the RS 4 Avant has also been redesigned. The optional matrix LED headlights with darkened bezels complete the revised appearance of the high-performance Avant and differentiate it within the A4 family. The wheel arches with the quattro blisters located above are each 30 millimeters (1.2 in) wider at the front and back as compared to the Audi A4 Avant. Gloss black design elements positioned right next to the headlights underline the effect of width of the new RS 4 Avant (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9,2 (25.6 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 208 (334.7 g/mi)).

The gloss black, matt aluminum and carbon styling packages add individual accents to the inlay in the sill, the exterior mirror housings and the front and rear bumpers. Upon request, the gloss black and carbon styling packages also include the Audi rings and the RS logo in black on the front and rear. The RS badges can be omitted completely for a more understated look. The roof rails are designed in matt black as standard. The RS-specific roof edge spoiler and the diffuser insert as well as the chrome tailpipes of the RS exhaust system give the vehicle a distinct finish. The optional RS sport exhaust system with black tailpipe trims creates a particularly sporty sound experience. The driver can decide whether they want a sporty or subdued sound via the Audi drive select dynamic handling system.

Full tractive power: the drive

With the 2.9 TFSI twin-turbo V6, Audi Sport GmbH is building on the legendary 2.7 liter V6 of the first RS 4 Avant from 1999. Back then, the twin-turbo V6 had a power output of 279 kW (380 metric hp). The new RS 4 Avant now outputs 331 kW (450 metric hp), which equals an output of 155.5 metric hp per liter. This allows the RS 4 Avant to accelerate from zero to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in just 4.1 seconds. The TFSI engine weighs just 182 kilograms (401.2 lb), which is 31 kilograms (68.3 lb) less than the V8 engine in the predecessor model from 2012. This benefits the gross weight and the axle load distribution—two prerequisites for the impressive performance. The twin-turbo V6 applies an impressive 600 Nm (442.5 lb-ft) of torque to the crankshaft in a broad engine speed range from 1,900 to 5,000 rpm. The RS dynamic package increases the electronically governed top speed from 250 to 280 km/h (155.3 to 174.0 mph).

The two turbochargers of the 2.9 TFSI are each assigned to a cylinder bank and build up a boost pressure of up to 1.5 bar. Like with all V6 and V8 engines from Audi, the turbochargers are installed within the 90-degree interior “V” of the cylinder banks, and thus the exhaust side of the cylinder heads is on the inside, while the intake side is on the outside of the engine. This layout enables compact construction and short gas flow paths with minimal flow losses, allowing the 2.9 TFSI to respond particularly spontaneously to movement of the accelerator pedal.

The high-output V6 impresses not only with its strong performance but also with its high level of efficiency. In the new WLTP driving cycle, it consumes just 9.2 liters of fuel per 100 kilometers (25.6 US mpg), which corresponds to 208 grams of CO2 per kilometer (334.7 g/mi). This constitutes a consumption reduction by 17 percent as compared to the previous model. A decisive factor in this is the new TFSI combustion process from Audi, which is known as the B-cycle. It has been specifically designed for the partial-load range, which is the predominant operating mode during normal use. In the case of higher loads and rotational speeds, the two-stage Audi valvelift system (AVS) closes the intake valves later, thereby increasing the opening duration to a crank angle of 200 degrees. Simultaneously, valve lift increases from 6.0 to 10 millimeters (from 0.2 to 0.4 in). The cylinder charge thereby increases accordingly—the engine revs up powerfully and delivers an opulent output.

The power of the 2.9 TFSI flows to the quattro permanent all-wheel drive system via the sporty eight-speed tiptronic. In regular driving, the system delivers more power to the rear axle. Its purely mechanical center differential directs 60 percent of the torque to the rear axle and 40 percent to the front. If undesired slip occurs at one axle, most of the power is automatically and rapidly redirected to the other axle—up to 70 percent to the front or up to 85 percent to the rear axle. The high locking values enable a clearly defined torque distribution and highly precise interaction with the control systems of the ESC and wheel-selective torque control.

Wheel-selective torque control is active on all types of surfaces. When driving with a sporty style, it brakes the the wheels on the inside of the curve very slightly via the Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC), thereby increasing the drive torque on the wheels on the outside of the curve with the higher wheel load. The difference in drive forces turns the car into the bend, allowing the car to follow the steering angle precisely. The result: precise, agile and neutral handling. The optional quattro sport differential with RS-specific tuning ensures an even more dynamic response when accelerating in corners. It distributes the torque between the rear wheels actively and in a targeted manner, thereby improving traction, stability and dynamics. When turning or accelerating in a curve, the torque is predominantly steered toward the rear wheel on the outside of the curve—the car is literally pressed into the curve, eliminating even the slightest hint of understeer. In case of oversteer, the sport differential stabilizes the vehicle by directing torque to the wheel on the inside of the curve.

Sporty tuning: the suspension

The axle concept of the suspension with five-link suspensions at the front and rear enables the optimal absorption of longitudinal and lateral forces. With the standard RS sport suspension, the Audi RS 4 Avant (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9,2 (25.6 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 208 (334.7 g/mi)) is seven millimeters (0.3 in) lower than the S4 base model with sport suspension.

The RS sport suspension plus with Dynamic Ride Control (DRC) enables even more agile handling and is available upon request. This integrated roll and pitch stabilizer consists of a special damper system that counteracts the movements of the vehicle body with no delay without the use of electronics. When the vehicle is turning into and traveling around a bend, the damper response is altered so that the vehicle’s movements around the longitudinal axis (roll) and around the transverse axis (pitch) are significantly reduced. The dampers are each connected diagonally to a central valve via two separate oil lines. The valves provide the necessary compensating volume via internal pistons with the gas-filled compartment behind them. When the vehicle is steering into and traveling around a bend, an oil flow is generated between the diagonally opposite dampers via the central valve, thus creating additional damping force. When one side is cushioned, the damping characteristics are altered such that roll and pitch movements are almost eliminated. As a result, this highly responsive damper system ensures that the RS models are particularly precise when negotiating bends.

With the aid of Audi drive select, the driver can influence the damper response on three levels and thereby personalize the driving experience. The new generation of dampers with integrated valve is more compact and lighter. In addition, it enables the damping forces to be spread even more widely between the comfort and dynamic modes as well as more precise suspension adjustment for high damping forces, which occur when cornering at speed in particular. The result: The RS sport suspension with Dynamic Ride Control (DRC) ensures a markedly comfortable rolling motion in the “comfort” setting. In the “dynamic” program, it delivers extraordinarily taut driving precision even when cornering at high speed.

RS-specific dynamic steering is available as an alternative to the standard electromechanical power steering. Dynamic steering varies the steering ratio by up to 100 percent based on the driving speed, steering angle and selected mode in the Audi drive select handling system. At low driving speeds—in city traffic and in maneuvering—the dynamic steering operates very directly; all it takes is two full turns of the steering wheel to travel from end stop to end stop. The level of power assistance is also high, making parking maneuvers a piece of cake. On country roads, the directness of the steering response and electric power assist are reduced progressively. When driving at high speeds on the highway, the indirect gear ratio and low level of power assistance smooth out jerky steering movements and assist with confident directional stability. Dynamic steering works closely with the electronic stabilization control program (ESC) to achieve sporty handling and driving safety. If necessary, it counter-steers slightly; its slight corrections, most of which are unnoticeable to the driver, reduce understeer and oversteer due to load alterations in the vast majority of situations. When braking on road surfaces with different friction coefficients, the system helps by means of stabilizing steering corrections.

The driver can create their personal driving experience via the standard Audi drive select dynamic handling system. There are five profiles available: comfort, auto, dynamic and the customizable, RS-specific RS1 and RS2 modes. The Audi drive select dynamic handling system influences the engine and transmission management, the power steering, the suspension, the dynamic steering, the quattro sport differential, the engine sound and the characteristics of the automatic air conditioning. The customizable RS2 mode exists specifically to influence the Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC) quickly at the push of a button.

The new RS 4 Avant is factory-equipped with 19-inch forged aluminum 265/35 wheels. Various 20-inch designs are available upon request, including a new fully milled five-arm wheel painted completely in matt bronze. It uses 275/30 tires. Powerful RS steel brakes with perforated composite disks ensure confident deceleration behavior. They have a diameter of 375 millimeters (14.8 in) at the front axle and 330 millimeters (13.0 in) at the rear axle.
The six-piston brake calipers with RS logos are painted in black, or optionally in red. Upon request, particularly fade-resistant RS ceramic brakes operate at the front axle. The calipers are available in red, gray and blue. Their perforated disks have a diameter of 400 millimeters (15.7 in).

Connected cockpit: the interior

The Audi RS 4 Avant (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9,2 (25.6 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 208 (334.7 g/mi)) features a black interior. LED light guides trace the contours of the doors and the center console—doing so in up to 30 different colors in combination with the optional ambient lighting package. The horizontal alignment of the instrument panel creates a sense of spaciousness. The driver and front passenger are welcomed by the illuminated door sill trims that bear the RS 4 logo. Upon request, the
RS design package adds some color to the interior, with the RS logo featured on the center console, the armrests, seat belts and floor mats. The steering wheel, selector lever and knee pads are all covered with Alcantara with red contrasting stitching. In addition to the red, the extended RS design package now also offers accents in gray. As a new highlight for the RS design package in red, the seat brackets in the backrest are also available in the matching color.

The 10.1-inch MMI touch display is the control center of the new operating system. It is located in the center of the instrument panel and tilted slightly toward the driver. The touch-sensitive screen displays a high-resolution graphic animation of an RS 4 Avant to welcome the driver. The MMI touch display provides acoustic feedback and takes over the functions of the previous rotary pushbutton on the center console. The driver can use the RS monitor to call up an overview of drive system component temperatures, maximum g-forces and information regarding tire pressures and temperatures. In the Audi virtual cockpit, special RS displays provide information on tire pressure, torque, power output, engine oil temperature, lap timings, acceleration measurements and g-forces. The shift light display prompts the driver to upshift when the rev limit is reached. The optional head-up display also providers some RS-specific information, for example the shift light display.

With its strict hierarchies, the menu structure of the new operating system is tailored to the user’s expectations and aims for easy operation. The natural language control also understands many phrases used in everyday language and quickly translates them into commands. The navigation in the new RS 4 Avant is now even more versatile and user-friendly. Audi connect and Audi connect plus provide a host of online services, such as Car-to-X services, which take advantage of the swarm intelligence of the Audi fleet.

The driver can actuate the two RS1 and RS2 modes in Audi drive select directly via a new “RS MODE” button on the flat-bottomed RS multifunction sport leather steering wheel. This automatically opens the RS-specific displays in the Audi virtual cockpit. The new aluminum shift paddles are considerably larger than before. Aside from the steering wheel and the illuminated door sill trims, the RS sport seats with optional honeycomb pattern and the shift gate also bear the RS emblem.

Versatile: the equipment

The RS 4 Avant (combined fuel consumption in l/100 km: 9,2 (25.6 US mpg); combined CO2 emissions in g/km: 208 (334.7 g/mi)) provides the same level of everyday usability as the A4 Avant base model. The luggage compartment has a capacity of 495 liters (17.5 cu ft), which increases to 1,495 liters (52.8 cu ft) with the rear seats folded down and cargo loaded to the roof. The luggage compartment lid and the luggage compartment cover are electrically operated as standard. Sensor control for opening and closing the luggage compartment lid is available as an option, and a trailer towing hitch that can be unlocked electrically at the push of a button is also available upon request.

Upon request, the RS 4 assists the driver in many situations: More than 30 driver assist systems underline the all-round characteristics of the high-performance Avant. The options are summarized in the “tour” and “city” packages. They include the adaptive cruise assist with stop & go function for automatic distance control, the intersection assist, the lane change warning or the curb warning.

Customers of the RS 4 Avant can select from eight paint colors, including the new plain color Turbo blue and the new metallic color Tango red. The Audi exclusive program also includes many more customized paint finishes, for example Nogaro blue, pearl effect. This color already characterized the RS 2 Avant as the legendary forefather of all RS models back in 1994.

Legendary: the history

Like no other, the new Audi RS 4 Avant stands for the combination of high performance and everyday usability. Its line of ancestors dates back a full 25 years, to 1994, when the legendary RS 2 Avant was released.

1994 – Audi RS 2 Avant: Strong trendsetter
Audi set a strong trend with the RS 2 Avant in 1994: It was the world’s first high-performance sports car with five seats and a large luggage compartment. The distinctive exterior design and the fine interior with its two-color look and blue Alcantara seats also helped shape the style. The five-cylinder turbo squeezed 232 kW (315 metric hp) out of 2.2 liters of displacement, accelerated the Audi RS 2 Avant from a standstill to 100 km/h (62.1 mph) in 5.4 seconds, and reached a top speed of 262 km/h (162.8 mph). Porsche AG supplied parts such as brakes and wheels in its capacity as development and production partner.

1999 – compact displacement and high performance in the first generation
Cosworth Technology Ltd, which was integrated in the company shortly before, came into the picture as a cooperation partner for the first RS 4 Avant. Together with quattro GmbH, the English company made the 2.7 liter twin-turbo V6 with 279 kW (380 metric hp) even more powerful and torquey. The intake and exhaust ports were revised in accordance with the performance increase, the cross-sections of the air ducting on the intake and thrust sides was increased, and the dimensions of the turbochargers were also expanded. The efficiency was improved considerably thanks to larger intercoolers that were optimized for pressure loss. The RS 4 was thus designed for pure sportiness without sacrificing any of its everyday usability. It was in such high demand that Audi doubled the originally planned production figures.

2005 – Audi RS 4: Dynamics in three variants
The second generation of the RS 4 was launched in 2005. It was first released as a sedan and Avant and was later also available as a cabriolet. In terms of drive, it was equipped with the newly developed V8 high-revving engine with 4.2 liters of displacement. The direct injection engine had an output of 309 kW (420 metric hp). This was the first time that a manufacturer relied on the combination of gasoline direct injection and the high-engine-speed concept, which was derived from motorsports. This allows speeds of up to 8,250 rpm to be reached. Further technology highlights included the quattro drive with the asymmetrical dynamic torque distribution at a ratio of 40 percent at the front and 60 percent at the rear, which was new at the time, and the optional carbon fiber ceramic brakes.

2012 – Audi RS 4 Avant: The dynamic all-purpose vehicle
In February 2012, quattro GmbH presented the third generation of the RS 4, which was offered as an Avant exclusively, at the Geneva Motor Show. Just like its predecessor, the model was equipped with a 4.2 l V8 high-revving engine but with an increased output of 331 kW (450 metric hp).